2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai  2004 Digital Lifestyle Photography by Wilson Tai
"Visually Driven City (Hong Kong Nights)"     Produced by Wilson Tai      2004 Wilson Tai Originally a fishing village, Hong Kong is now a shopping paradise and free port market. Hong Kong was ceded to Britain as a result of the Opium War in 1842. In 1997, Hong Kong was given back to China. The intense lighting and bright signage of Mong Kok create a dazzling shopping experience full of eye-candy. The streets of Mong Kok. Make sure to stop and catch your breath. The Symphony of Lights is a public showcase of Hong Kong's harbour and is a light/laser/firework display to jumpstart the public's perception of the economy and well-being of Hong Kong. Funky colored tile at the Tsim Sha Tsui MTR (Mass Transit Railway) station. Train frequency is one every few minutes. The MTR stations are clean and modern though lacking the LCD flat-panel monitors that can be found in Shanghai's stations. Riding public transportation in Hong Kong is a great way to catch the current fashion and shopping trends amongst the people. The harbour of Hong Kong Island includes the districts: Central, Wan Chai and Causeway Bay. You can see the peak tower and the changing lights of the buildings. Uses of wood in the Interior decoration at a Tsim Sha Tsui Japanese restaurant. Cool use of neon sign work for the Central bar called Blowfish. Katherine's boyfriend is the gallery owner of Sanskrit. Part of the charm you'll find shopping in the streets for food and groceries is the exchange, interaction and conversation. Good timing at 8pm: A view of the explosive Symphony of Lights from the Hong Kong Yacht Club on Kellett Island. Hong Kong local and past ZUCC colleague, Katherine, and her posse (of locals and foreigners) post-dinner at the Yacht Club. An inland view of the Hong Kong Space Museum, with the Peninsula Hotel behind. Sinopec is a Chinese petroleum company. Yan of the Hong Kong-based weblog, Glutter. She's a fellow alumni of University of California, Santa Cruz. Corporate neon sign works throughout the harbour real estate. The Hong Kong convention center is the equivalent to Sydney's Opera House. The waters of Ap Lei Chau, where boats of the past, rest. The surrounding lands are lined with high-density housing skyscrapers. Jumbo, the floating seafood restaurant in Aberdeen, has a long history and is undergoing construction to update its old glory. Shark fin soup, anyone? The rare, vintage and flamboyant Chinese decoration is what makes Jumbo an attraction. Private harbour on the Southwest side of Hong Kong Island. Durian Fruit that has an alternate use as a spiked weapon. Fresh eggplant for sale at a street market in Chai Wan district. Alive and floppin' or dried and preserved; you can find any fish here. Poultry dealers line the covered sidewalks while the fresh produce are in the open street. Fresh fish, meat and fruit at the streets markets. Exchange rate is 7.8 HKD to 1.0 USD. Respect, thanks and a salute to Rosewood House for making the Hong Kong trip possible.